Knights

I’ve always been fascinated with knights.  Swords, armor, shields, horses, the medieval timeframe, and the idea of a warrior class has intrigued me since I was a child.  I remember checking out books from the library about knights.  One of the reasons why I like and can play chess is that I found a book that showed the various chess pieces and moves using illustrations that were based on knights.  

Eventually, as I grew older, I expanded my love of knights to a love of heroes in general.  I think that expansion started with Star Wars and the explanation of the Jedi Knights.  It was that movie (along with lesser movies of the time: Krull, Legend, and The Dark Crystal) l where I saw that heroism could apply to more time periods that just the medieval age.  Now, I know that knights as a class of people were not the “heroes” that we often think they were, regardless of the chivalric code.  However, to a child, they seemed to represent the best of both worlds–fighters with a code of ethics.

Perhaps that’s why I’m so fascinated with knights.  They are a class of warriors that (ideally) can be awesome at warfare, but also can respect others (yes, again, I know that this is naive and that “real” knights–from the Templars all the way down to the Crusaders were little better than thugs, but it is the IDEAL of knighthood that I’m discussing).  

Many of my stories revolve around the idea of something or somebody as a hero.  I got tickled by a former co-worker who read my work.  She happened to read two of my stories in which the main character fails.  I think I only have two or three of these so far.  She was saying to me that it looks like I like “sad” endings.  Actually, I think I’ve written 20+ stories so far, and out of all of these 90-95% the hero wins.  I really wanted to tell her this, but patron came up and I never did explain myself.  I’ve never been a fan of the “sad” (aka kill the main character) ending.  I only use it when the main character must sacrifice himself/herself for the greater good.  I’ve read too many stories (“All Things Dark and Deadly,” which I’m pretty sure was published in the RPG Cyberpunk 2020–although I could be mistaken for I no longer have the RPG to fact-check it) is a prime example of this.  Spoilers–the main character dies in that story for NO good reason.  This is the worse type of “ironic” ending, but I see it all too often (especially in short works).  

I seem to have an affinity with knights as several of my published works have some element of knights embedded in them.  Don’t be surprised if you see more “knights” (or heroes) in my fiction.  I really, REALLy like them!

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