Submissions Every Day This Week (So Far)

So, I just wanted to let you know that I’ve submitted a story every day this week.  This is sort of just an update post of sorts.  I won’t belabor this post, nor name the markets, but I did want to let readers now that I’m giving it my all after the depressing defeat last week of both my stories that were shortlisted being rejected.

Citizen X

I just sent my story Citizen X  out to a market today.  I’m sure it has 0% chance of getting in the magazine, but I wanted to send it today as today is their last day for allowing submissions for this reading period.  As they have 4 periods a year, I want to try to make sure that I submit each period even when I’m pretty sure that they won’t use the story.  Still, what is the old “saw” for people who play the lottery: “you can’t win if you don’t play.”


I submitted HawkeMoon to an anthology that had a theme.  The story matched very well with the actual anthology, but I’m not sure how much it matched the theme of the anthology.  I think that it might work for the theme of “Shards” and I revised it a bit to make that idea more explicit, but I’m really not sure its going to work for them.  They did, however, push their date back from Feb. 1st to March 1st, so I wanted to be sure to get the story to them and let them make the ultimate decision.  We’ll see.  Depending on how well they think that I interpreted their theme, this probably has the best chance of all of the ones I’ve submitted so far (of course, if they don’t think I hit the theme, it will probably be the exact opposite–oh well, we’ll see)


Dragonhawk has already been published by Tales of the Talisman and you can find it on Amazon if you’re curious.  However, there are several podcasts that are looking for stories (preferably reprints) that they can have narrators read as part of their podcasts.  There is a Fantasy version, Sci-Fi version and YA Fantasy/Sci-Fi version.  I sent this to the YA one, but it didn’t work, but I was determined to submit it to the Fantasy version when it reopened.  I’m determined that every story that I do that gets published will go to these podcasts for consideration.  I’ve not had much luck with the reprint market unlike other writers, but I like and listen to podcasts, so I’d love to have my work featured.

Silence Will Fall

So, Silence Will Fall just went to the same market that shortlisted Citizen X.  I’ve had some success with this market, but it isn’t a given (as one can see by their rejection of CX).  I really like SWF (I like all my stories, but of the recent ones, this is probably one of my favs) and I hope they take it, but the movie that I blogged about recently may hinder it from getting sold, but I’m going to do my best.  We’ll see and I’ll keep you all updated on this (and all the projects) that are being submitted and in the works.

See you next time!


Amazon Associate Disclaimer:
I earn a small commission on the purchase of these items.


Mini-Review: Alien Legion, Vol 1, Issue 14

So, as I try to come to grips with the Ship of Shadows graphic novel that I am writing, I am trying to relearn many of the lessons about graphic storytelling by rereading my comic book collection that I amassed as a teen.  Unfortunately, I weeded the collection down back in the late 90s/early 2000s and lost quite a few issues that would have been good to have.  I kept what I considered were the essentials, however.  So, I decided what better way to wrap my head around writing a graphic novel than by revisiting the comics that I so loved (yes, I know there are books like Scott McCloud’s seminal work on graphic novels–and I even own a couple–but what better way than to actually read the works that I’m trying to write and breakdown what those successful creators have done to really learn the form).

I’ve always liked the concept of Alien Legion ever since I first discovered it in a comic book spinner at Waldenbooks.  The idea of a galactic Foreign Legion spoke to my inner child just coming off the high that was Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi.  The characters are extremely captivating.  I guess the parallel that I could make would be to have intergalactic Fast and Furious.  Wait, I take that back–that’s not interesting at all, forget I said anything like that–that’s actually a very bad comparison (I say, as I hurriedly scribble down the idea to get it written before someone else does).

In all seriousness, it really is sort of like a “Dirty Dozen” in space.  You have a group of alien soldiers, mostly humanoid, who go on missions.  Being that this is an “Epic” imprint from Marvel (a “darker” imprint than normal Marvel comics published at the time), this allowed them to go into more adult territory.  This particular issue is really unique as it deals with domestic violence and   the effects that it has.  Yes, this is told in such a way that it can be digested in a YA comic, but for 1986 and for a medium that was often marketed to children, this one deals with some pretty revolutionary issues for the time.

While the artwork is a little rough, it is still easy to read and follow the action.  The actual dialogue and story is also well done–I like how it establishes each on of the main characters through action and dialogue.  Captain Sarigar, a snake-like alien, is obviously the protagonist of the story, but I like how he involves two of the more hard-bitten Legionnaires in what is obviously a personal mission based on their reputations for being hard cases.  The story is very well done (for all of the “heavy” themes) and illustrates the dangers of domestic violence, both physically and emotionally to the victim.  For a comic book, it handles the subject matter surprisingly well and still manages to tell a strong story about a brother who, despite his obligations as a Captain in the Legion and a fierce warrior, only wants to protect his sister from an abusive boyfriend.

Overall Grade: B+


Amazon Associate Disclaimer:
I earn a small commission on the purchase of these items.

Back from the 2018 TPA Conference


Tennessee Philological Association Logo, Image Source: Facebook

I’m back from the 2018 Tennessee Philological Conference and I thought it was a great conference!  There were tons of awesome presenters and I was able to present my paper as well and it seemed to go over pretty well, so, I enjoyed it very much!  The conference shifts between east, middle, and west Tennessee (we’re a wide state in the US) and it was in the (I think) the east part of the state.  I’m not sure if I can make it if it is in the western part of the state as that would be a long drive for me, but I would certainly like to do so, if at all possible.

Tennesse Tech Henderson Hall

Tennessee Tech University, Henderson Hall (where the 2018 TPA Conference was held), Image Source: Wikipedia

Tennessee Tech. University

This year, the conference was held at Tennessee Tech University (TTU) in Cookeville, TN and I have to say thanks to the students and administrators.  They were extremely nice–to the student who gave me great landmarks to get to the designated parking lot, to the secretaries for pointing me in the right direction to the conference location on–campus, they were really a nice group of people.


Cookeville, Tennessee, Image Source:

Cookeville was also interesting.  I’d never been before, so it was interesting to see what another college town (Murfreesboro could also be considered a college town) looked like.  It seemed smaller than Murfreesboro, but no less vibrant.  I only got to see a little of it–the campus environs and the apartment complexes close to campus, and the main “strip” of businesses devoted to serving the college students, but it really seemed like a cool place.  The drive wasn’t bad–only about an hour from Murfreesboro.  It was a Thurs evening., Friday, and Saturday morning Conference.  I could only make the Friday events, but I stayed the entire day–including for the reception and banquet Friday evening and had a great time!

Familiar Faces and New

So, I didn’t take as many pictures as I should have–that’s my one main regret.  I was so focused on getting there, listening to the speakers, presenting my own paper, and generally trying to take in the experience, that I realized that I didn’t take nearly enough pictures.  I was, however, able to get pictures with two of my favorite professors from UTC, Dr. Rehyansky and Dr. Shawen (I didn’t get explicit permission, so I won’t put them in the post), but I’m glad that I was able to do that and will be putting those pictures in my photo album.  I met several new people from the conference and hope to see them again next year if I’m able to attend.  All in all, it was a great experience that I hope I’m able to repeat next year! 🙂


Amazon Associate Disclaimer:
I earn a small commission on the purchase of these items.

What’s On My Bookshelf? The Belgariad Volumes 1 and 2 by David Eddings


Welcome to the (hopefully) weekly: What’s on My Bookshelf? This week it is The Belgariad, Vol. 1 and Vol. 2.

The Belegariad series is one of, if not, my favorite Fantasy series of all time–I go back and forward on this.  It is a little dated by today’s settings, but it acts as an apotheosis to the GrimDark series that are currently popular in today’s fantasy novels.  It has a Good Guy (Protagonist) and a Ultimate Evil (Antagonist), however, even though you know  who the antagonist is, you don’t actually get direct overt conflict for a while between the two.

Yes, yes, I know in the days of GrimDark and where “everybody” is a bad guy, even the “good guys,” this seems old fashioned, but I still feel that heroes (for fiction) are much more realistic because they always have the “hardest” road to follow and GrimDark characters take the “easy” way out–hence, the popularity of GrimDark and the Anit-Hero.  Easy is better more fun while hard means you have to work and sacrifice and who wants to all that in today’s world?


Belgariad, Vol. 1 (includes Pawn of Prophecy, Queen of Sorcery, and Magician’s Gambit).

Belgariad, Vol. 1 includes the first 3 books in the Belgariad series.  Essentially, it tells the story of Garion, a simple farm boy and scullion who may be more than he seems.  The early chapters talk about his time on Faldor’s Farm and foreshadow quite a few bits of information before uprooting him from his life and plunging him into adventure.  This is a great set-up for the protagonist as we get to see him grow and develop as the experiences his various adventures.  This is high fantasy at its best–pseudo-medieval world/technology level, magic, non-human races as “monsters” and antagonists, but only different “human” races (i.e., no elves, dwarves, etc.).  The world-building is extremely well done and so too is the magic system.  I read these as individual books, but liked them so much that I bought the trade paperbacks of the books.  These two books literally helped me to get through school and I try to read them once a year whenever possible.


Belgariad, Vol. 2 (includes Enchanter’s Endgame and Castle of Wizardry)

Belgariad, Vol. 2 includes the last 2 books in the Belgariad series.  These two books tell the story of the protagonist who finally comes into his own, discovers his true heritage and sets out to meet and face the challenges of his destiny.  I like this one because it is the conclusion to the series, but it really pays off on the promises set up in the first volume.  It adds a love interest and it also adds in the “Big Bad” of the series and their ultimate confrontation.  To me, it is a satisfying conclusion to the series.

It is a good, clean read (gasp, in the days of the “Red Wedding” or “Negan Kills–both of which I only know through their infamous nature, the idea that something doesn’t have to be super violent or sexy to be fun is shocking, I know 🙂 , but it can be done and David Eddings proves it with this series).  While not written for young adults, it is also appropriate for young adults as well as adults, so this one could be for you or younger fantasy readers (not two young–I’d say Tweens and up as their quite a few double-entendres and mild (PG) thematic elements, but no explicit violence or sex scenes–its just good fantasy).  Anyway, here is a weekly peek into what’s on my Bookshelf.

As always, the links will take you to and if you purchase through these links, I get a small commission which will help me, so thanks in advance!  See you next week, hopefully!


Amazon Associate Disclaimer:
I earn a small commission on the purchase of these items.

Tennessee Philological Association Conference

So, today’s blog will be fairly short as I am not actually here!  Nice trick that.  I’m actually attending the Tennessee Philological Association Conference today in Cookeville TN today at Tennessee Technical University.  In fact, I’m not only attending it, but I’m also presenting a paper “American Made: Turn of the Century Technological Advances and Edith Wharton’s Fiction” that I wrote for my Edith Wharton class last semester.  Yay, Edith!

I will blog about the experience next week as I have attended a conference before, but that was at Chattanooga–this is the first time I’ve had to travel out of town to a Conference and I don’t mind telling you, I’m a bit nervous and unsure about the whole thing.

Still, I chose this one as it is close–only about an hour away.  It also is has four other people besides myself going whom I know, two from MTSU and two from UTC, so hopefully I can find them and perhaps get my bearings before it is time for me to present my paper.  Anyway, wish me luck–I’m going to need it!  🙂


Amazon Associate Disclaimer:
I earn a small commission on the purchase of these items.

And Then There Were None

rejection_Lyn Fairchild Hawks

So, originally, this post was supposed to be entitled, “And Then There was One,” but I’ve heard back from the final publisher who had a story in consideration (“Silence Will Fall“) and by the image, you can pretty much see what the result was for the story.  I wasn’t really going to cover this in any great detail–just mention it along with the other rejections and move on with a generalized post on rejections–but there was a development over the time that I sent this story in and it was rejected.

A Quiet Place

So, in between the time that I submitted Silence Will Fall (SWF) the trailer for a new horror movie debuted called A Quiet Place.  While I had no idea that it was in development, nor did I even know about it until the trailer was released, it (coincidentally) shares many of the aspects that SWF has in it: 1) the idea that one must be super-quiet in order to be avoid being hunted, 1) the idea that noise attracts the “hunters” 3) both even features the characters using sign language, for Pete’s sake (although I assume that’s a natural outgrowth as I–and I assume, the filmmakers–both reasonably extrapolated that human communication would still need to happen and the only reasonably detailed system that works reliably would be some sort of sign language).  Now, the trailers don’t show the enemy, but they appear humanoid from the snatches of images that you get to see, while mine are completely and utterly alien in construction.  Still, I have a feeling that this trailer pretty much sank the chances of my story and I’ll detail why in a moment.  For now, here’s the trailer:

Brandon Sanderson’s Law

So, this is probably more a truism than an actual law, but as Brandon Sanderson articulated in Book 1 of his Stormlight Archives series, The Way of Kings, people don’t value originality and distinctness, so much as they do timeliness.  If two people invent something at roughly the same time, people valorize and praise the first and denigrate the second, considering it an also-ran.  History is replete with examples from the scientific community where scientists, working (unknowingly) on similar projects, papers, and discoveries have published their work/findings mere days apart and in pretty much every case, the glory of the find went to the first, even if the second was a more detailed or better formulation.  It also occurs in sports, in art, in pretty much every human endeavor–we valorize the first, regardless as to if it is the best.  I’m even doing here, as Sanderson was the first articulation I’d heard of this idea, and even though I already knew it implicitly, since he was the first one to say it explicitly, I’m naming it after him (for my purposes, at least–hence, Sanderson’s Law).

Silence Will Fall vs. A Quiet Place

Unfortunately, I feel that SWF probably fell victim to Sanderson’s Law and will continue to fall under its sway.  I didn’t “copy” A Quiet Place as SWF was from a dream–one where I can still see the final image in my mind’s eye even as I type these words.  While I’m pretty caught up (I feel) on Pop. Culture, I had no idea this movie even existed until the first trailer hit–and then my heart sank a little.  Of course, I can’t prove that the rejection was influenced by this, but I’m sure that if the editor(s) saw the trailer (and being that they are a Sci-Fi/Fantasy/Horror publication, it is likely that they did), it certainly didn’t help.

Will I continue to submit the story and hope for a publication, knowing that Sanderson’s Law is in effect?  Yes–but what else can I do?  It represents countless hours of story planning, drafting, revising, and editing, in addition to the time spent in the Writing Center and from my “Alpha Readers” getting feedback on it.  I can’t just abandon it to sit in a drawer somewhere for fifteen years or twenty years until people “forget” about A Quiet Place.  In this era of divergent and multitudinous options for content and content delivery, there has to come a time when more stories, even if they are similar, are accepted and published without regard to other media available.  One wonders how one ever become popular and mainstream if the “gatekeepers” never actually open up the gates?


Amazon Associate Disclaimer:
I earn a small commission on the purchase of these items.

Commodore 64 Nostalgia Review: World Karate Championship

So, World Karate Championship (Internation Karate in Europe), by Epyx was one of my favorite C64 games growing up.  I absolutely adored it and I am convinced (although I could be mistaken–I haven’t actually researched the development of the game to know for sure) that it and its competitor,  Data East’s, Karate Champ (which, in looking it up to verify the name, I discovered had sued Epyx claiming that the games were too similar, but apparently lost) had an influence on the modern fighter and games like the original Street Fighter as it exhibits many of the same characteristics–announcer, rounds, tournament fighting, etc., but in a “proto-form.”

The game is a traditional round-based fighting game.  It features a best two out of three system, but like a Karate tournament, you can have half-points (for smaller hits) and full points (for more devastating hits).  You can fight in different stages (areas) across the world, and has “bonus” stages in between the action in order to break bricks/boards for extra points.  What I liked at the time is that it had a belt system, and started your character at a white-belt and moved up through the rankings as you progressed, with higher colored belts meaning more difficult opponents.

I may have mentioned it before, but as someone who took martial arts and was interested in all things martial arts at the time, I took to this came right away.  The control scheme was its only downfall, as it only worked with one button and many of the moves had to be executed with a combination of the joystick and button and it was very imprecise and “sticky” compared to games like Street Fighter II and Mortal Kombat which came along a little later and solved the “control” problem. That is why you see so many “misses” in the footage above.

My uncle and I used to have epic battles when playing two player against one another.  I’ll always remember the fun times I had while playing this game–and yes, that “soundtrack” did loop over and over constantly.  I’d forgotten just how repetitive the music was until I heard it on loop as I was writing this blog, but boy, does it bring back the memories.  And that’s sort of the point of this nostalgia reviews, isn’t it? 🙂

Have a great day!