Comic-Con Week–Stranger Things Season 2

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Image Source: SDCC Blog

So the San Diego Comic-Con (SDCC) or Comic-Con as it is usually referred to, happened this week and this is a celebration of all things comic book related, but also it is a huge intersection for Science Fiction and Fantasy.  While I’m not really a “con” guy myself, I still have found myself drawn to Comic-con because of all the announcements and trailers of upcoming Sci-Fi, Fantasy, and Comic Book movie properties in the past few years.

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Stranger Things Season 2 (Image Source: CNN)

So this week, like E3, I’m going to take a moment to highlight some of my favorite announcements/trailers from the convention.  Today it’s going to be Stranger Things, Season 2.  My understanding is that this series (Netflix only) appears on Halloween (Oct. 31) and I’m pretty stoked about it.

Even though I’m linking the trailer in this blog post–Stranger Things, Season 2 Trailer–I haven’t watched it all the way through.  In fact, I’ve only seen about the first 10 seconds (the very first scene in the trailer).  If you watch those 10 seconds, you’ll see the kids peering into an arcade cabinet and playing a video game, Dragon’s Lair (pictured above).  That video game is one that I played when I was a kid (& bought on my PS3 when it was offered for sale digitally). To steal a line from popular culture, “They had me at Dragon’s Lair.”  I’m in.  I’m hoping that it won’t veer too far into the realm of horror and that it will stay creepy and thrilling without getting to gory, but we’ll see.

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Image Source: Steam

I’m excited for show and based on just the first 10 seconds of the trailer.  Job well done, Netflix marketing department.  Well done.  *Slow clap.*

Black Panther vs. Spider-Man: Learning How to Navigate Social Interactions through Comic Book Trading

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Image Source: Heroic Universe

So, in high school, I developed a passion for comics (heroic, mostly).  This was just before the time of Graphic Novels exploded in popularity where individual comic book issues were still the dominant form of comic book collecting/reading.  In my freshman year, I found several acquaintances who shared my passion and I watched as they traded issues amongst themselves.

Eventually, I joined their group and began to become involved in reading and trading comics.  As noted before, Spider-Man was my favorite hero at the time and I traded whenever possible for Spider-Man comics.  However, one of my friends bought and read a four-issue mini-series of Black Panther.  He traded it to me and I read it and enjoyed it, but again, wanted as many issues of Spider-Man as possible, so then I traded it for four Spider-Man comics.  My friend found out about it and confronted me and said that if I wanted to trade them to “X” person, I would have done so, but I traded them to you.  Luckily, our friendship survived that “rocky” incident, and flourished during our junior and senior years (but unfortunately, we lost touch during college), but I’ve always regretted trading away those comics.

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Image Source: Comic Vine (GameSpot)

Black Panther is such a “unique” character in that he (along with Storm) represent a non-traditional representation of a character of African descent.  While I like Cyborg (yes, I know, different publisher than Black Panther and Storm), I’ve always found that his characterization (like most African-American, African-descendent characters) relied on too much stereotype (esp. in the late 80s/early 90s).  Cyborg (and other characters of color) during that time period would often drop endings on words (such as I’m goin’, I’m goin’).  In the late 90s, early 2000s, this morphed to “cool” catchphrases such as “Booyah!”  Black Panther and Storm are both articulate and well-spoken, highly moral (often surpassing Captain America in terms of “Goodness”), and highly educated.  They are often aspirational and represent the “best” of the culture of African/African Americans/Those of Color.

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Image Source: Pinterest

With the upcoming Black Panther movie, I really wish that I’d kept that particular mini-series.  While I’m familiar with the Black Panther, I’d love a “refresher course” on the character to see what changes Marvel has made.  I’d also love to be able to compare comic and movie changes to Black Panther in the same way that I could do a comparison with Spider-Man’s movies and comics.  I will try to find out if that storyline was adapted/reprinted in a Graphic Novel, but somehow it won’t be the same.  To have the actual issues in hand to refer back to as well as the nostalgia of the issues and the trade and the friendship–that is something older me would tell younger me is far more important than the ephemeral satisfaction of “making the trade.”