Let’s (not) talk about CBS All Access

cbs-and-star-trek_exstreamist

So one of the new TV shows that I was all set to talk about was the new Star Trek show that will be debuting in the Fall.  New Star Trek show, you say?  Wait, why haven’t I heard of this new show?  Because, instead of being rational and putting this show on CBS or a traditional streaming service such as Netflix or Hulu, CBS is going to leverage this show and only put it out in the US and Canada on its new fledgling streaming service, CBS All Access for $5.99 a month. 😦

That’s right, instead of going the traditional route and having commercials pay for the program, or a distributor (such as Hulu or Netflix) pick up the show and pay for it, they are going use it as the backbone leverage consumers to pay for yet another online streaming service in order to get access to their programs.  Not only do they want advertisers to pay them (for the programs on CBS), but they also want consumers to pay them as well.  Just like HBO Go, CBS executives see consumers as a pot of gold that they want “access” to, but unlike HBO Go, CBS isn’t a premium service.  The only way you can get HBO is to be a cable subscriber–HBO Go was designed for “cord cutters” like me who wanted just the content they want and nothing extra, which is something cable companies still in 2017 won’t let you do.  CBS has no legitimate reason to withhold content except profit, or in this case greed as they have a channel on “free” TV as one of the big 3 networks–ABC, NBC, CBS.

Why is it greedy, you might ask?  They’re a company and they are in business to make a profit, right?  Then I ask you, why, oh why, are they allowing Netflix to show the new Star Trek show a day after it premieres on CBS All Access all over the world EXCEPT in the US and Canada?  Two words, “online piracy.”  CBS knows full well that pirates all over the world are not going to stand for “locking down of content” in this way.  So this it their bet, give everyone else an opportunity to get it legitimately, but force consumers in the US and Canada not to have an option to get it anywhere but though our All Access service.  There is no reason why CBS could not have included the US and Canada in their negotiations with Netflix other than the desire to use the show to launch their own streaming service.  Netflix would love to be the premiere player in the streaming world as is in a two-way dogfight with Hulu and Amazon.com Prime streaming.  You know that a new Star Trek show on their network would be a feather in their cap (esp. since Amazon won the rights to the Grand Tour with the former hosts of Top Gear).

Much like the AMC foolishness with Spider-Man Homecoming, companies continue to shoot themselves in the foot through outlandish schemes to increase their revenue streams.  Here’s an idea (one that I’m ardently trying to follow myself as a writer): put out a high quality product that is so good that it gets people excited and talking about it and makes them want more in that universe and makes them look forward to the next project that you’re working on and the next after that and so on and so on and so on . . .

That (in my opinion) is a truly sustainable business model.

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Cutting the Cord

cutting the cord

HAPPY NEW YEAR!  Welcome to the first post of the blog for 2016!  Huzzah!  My goal (not Resolution, but goal) is to post on a weekly schedule.  I did so during the last of November and most of December, even with the craziness of grading and deadlines, so it seems doable.

This post was supposed to be the last post of 2015, but it took longer to put into put into place than I anticipated.  This post is all about cutting the cord (or moving from a cable-based future to a streaming one).

Yesterday, I finally turned in my cable boxes and remotes and I’m completely based on streaming content (for TV/Movies) or pulling content from over-the-air (local & live sports).  Yes, I know that with a few tech options I could eliminate the over the air part and do it all digitally, but it works better for my workflow to have at least 1 TV dedicated to local programming (news) and live sports.

APPLE TV

AppleTV

My main source of streamed content is via the new AppleTV.  I have an Apple ecosystem and having the new AppleTV gives me the most flexibility.  I can buy shows and movies through iTunes, download digital copies from iTunes from the Blu-Rays that I purchase, and I can AirPlay apps and games that I purchase on my phone and iPad to the TV if I so choose.

The key is to set a budget and stick to it.  There are so many things out there and available that it is easy to overspend if you overdo it.  I’ve found that if I focus on one or two series at a time and finish them before buying anything else, I can stay within budget.  I don’t have a lot of time to watch TV anyway, so focusing only on shows and movies that truly interest me seems to be a more cost effective and efficient way of consuming content.

ITUNES, NETFLIX AND AMAZON PRIME

With Netflix and Amazon Prime, I get many of the shows that I’m interested in (of course, Science Fiction/Fantasy) like Star Trek (the various spinoffs), Dark Matter (new 2015 show), Stargate (older shows like SG-1), and Farscape.  These are just the few that I’ve investigated.  I’m sure there are others.  I also get access to a few movies, though not as many as I’d like (again, genre-based).  For the movies, this is where I use iTunes to supplement Netflix/Amazon.

Here, though, is a drawback of streaming only.  The movie industry saw the lowering of prices of music and fought that vigorously arguing that lower prices devalue their product.  Yes, the link is a bit old, but it is only to illustrate a point.  Movies are artificially higher in price than they are truly worth.  You can’t tell me that Jack the Giant Slayer (a 2013 release with below average ratings) is worth $14.99 which is the same price that The Martian (a 2015 release which will contend for the Oscars more than likely).  Jack the Giant Slayer should be in the 7.99-9.99 range by now.  It is the problem with many digital pricing structures–prices do not seem to go down over time, while the physical prices do because retailers need to clear shelf space for the next new thing.  You never have to run out of the digital item so retailers don’t lower the prices over time.

The easiest way I can think of not to spend a ton of money on movies is to set a budget that roughly equals 1 movie ($14-$20) per period on viewing media per pay period and not go over that.  Include Season Passes for shows that I want to watch that aren’t on Netflix & Amazon Prime and I’ll need to limit myself and make a choice–1 big purchase of a movie or 1 Season Pass which will last several weeks (or less if I binge watch the show).

Still, even this is preferable to paying a premium every month for TV & movies that I never will watch.

THE FUTURE

So, this will be an interesting experiment.  Can I watch the shows that I want to watch and the movies while not breaking the bank so to speak?

I think I can as I just watched the entire Series 9 of Dr. Who (Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman), in addition to the Christmas Specials of Dr. Who and Sherlock via iTunes, and I’m watching/rewatching the entire series run of Star Wars: The Clone Wars on Netflix before turning my attention to Star Wars Rebels via iTunes.

I’ll keep you all posted periodically on my successes and struggles as I try to embrace a (nearly) streaming only household.